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feminist thought and carework

[Originally published related to SOC 359 – Sociology of Work]
I’m reading a text about “Capitalism and the Erosion of Care” detailing how the capitalism model lowers the dignity of carework.
I’m very troubled by many of the texts I am being asked to read for this class. This article details the injustice given unto women who give carework- in this case, taking care of the kids at home, taking care of a sick parent, working at a non-profit for sub-market wages, etc.
My largest problem with this is I work for a non-profit for sub-market wages. Why is this literature very careful to detail the injustice as a feminist one? Honestly, I think there are many more reasons for non-profit employees not being paid at market value, the least of which is the gender of the employee.
Anytime anyone cares more about the mission of the company or organization than what they make, the potential of working for sub-market wages exists. This is not a woman’s problem or a man’s problem- it is simply a reality of the work. In business, the motivation to work is normally profits and so working for sub-market wages lead to the problem of why work for a company that is making money off of you. That’s another debate.
With non-profit work, by definition, it is not about capitalism. It is about doing something for the good involved in doing it. Sure, we need money and so non-profits have paid employees. Do I protest because I am not paid what I am worth? No. Why? Because the mission is more important. It is not because I’m a woman (because I’m not) and I am not making more than others at my workplace because I’m a man. We’re all underpaid for what we’re worth- sex or gender doesn’t matter.
If I can pay the bills and maintain the quality of life I’d like, then I’m happy with my pay. Again, nothing to do with being a man or a woman.
It annoys me when gender or race or religion or some class as such is seen as the only group that suffers from a problem that completely isn’t dependent on that class.
It doesn’t help that my professor is a self-proclaimed feminist that appears to think that my life will always be better than a female cohort because I have that XY genetic marker.

By Brandon Kraft

My life is an open-source book.

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