Categories
WordPress

Genesis eNews Extended 2.2

Today, I shipped a new version of Genesis eNews Extended. Beyond some minor invisible stuff—bringing everything up to modern PHPCS rules—the latest version brings in a new set of classes that theme designers can use to more surgically modify the design of their subscriptions forms.

Suggested and implemented by Mike Hemberger, also known as JiveDig, this version adds a number of classes for easier theming:

  • enews-form, a class on the top-level form element.
  • enews-fname, a class on the first name form field.
  • enews-lname, a class on the last name form field.
  • enews-email, a class on the e-mail address form field.
  • enews-submit, a class on the submit button.

The form has always been wrapped in a div element with the enews class. This version also adds a new enews-{$field_count}-field(s) class to that div so you can apply different rules if there are 1 field—for only the e-mail address—or 2 or 3 if there are one or two name fields.

As part of my commitment to backward-compatibility, no classes were removed or changed—only additions—so this update is safe for existing sites without any need to make changes.

A major thanks to Mike for using eNews Extended, seeing room for improvement, and then going to the next level to implement it. If you have suggestions for improvements or would like to submit patches, check out Genesis eNews Extended on GitHub.

Categories
WordPress

1,000,000 Blocked Attempts

Today, my site hit a milestone. Jetpack Protect has blocked 1,000,000 malicious login attempts.

Typically, when using the wrong user name and password on the site, those credentials are sent to the site itself and you’ll see the site’s response that it was a bad password. Since a bunch of bots could try every combination, it could eventually guess your password.

Jetpack Protect monitors who is submitting failed login attempts on every site using Jetpack Protect. When it sees a single actor failing a number of login attempts—on one site or multiple sites—it will block that person from attempting to login on any site using Jetpack Protect.

Categories
WordPress

Emoji 13 Coming to WordPress

As of r48048-core, WordPress will polyfill Emoi 13 glyphs on devices that do not support them.

What this means is whether or not your viewer’s device is able to display a 🫀 or not, you can include one on your WordPress site and it’ll display for them.

You have stuff to do — like feed your kids 👨‍🍼 or tend to a plant 🪴 or making face masks 🪡 — so no need to think about whether or not someone will see an emoji or a blank box on your site.

It isn’t magic 🪄. WordPress has a small bit of JavaScript that will check if your browser will render one of the latest emoji and see if it is what we’d expect or not. If not, it’ll load a script to replace emoji characters with graphical images. If it does support the latest emoji standard, it’ll do nothing and let the viewer’s operating system display it like normal.

This will roll out to production as part of the WordPress 5.5, expected to ship in August.

Categories
WordPress

Happy Birthday WordPress!

Yesterday marked the 17th anniversary of the first release of WordPress. I didn’t use WordPress back then—I didn’t find my way to it until it was a youthful four years old in 2007.

In the 13 years since, the software has made a major impact of my life, sure, but the community around it has a greater impact. The community is what hooked me into using it and helped me grow as from a shade-tree tinkerer to working as a full-time developer at Automattic.

I didn’t appreciate the nuance of software licenses back then. I hadn’t heard about the four freedoms of software. For me, once I understood the idea, I was hooked. It just made sense.

Thanks WordPress and, more importantly, all the people behind it for 17 years of community and open source.

Categories
WordPress

Jetpack’s Publicize Now Uses Twitter Cards

A long time ago, Jetpack’s Publicize feature—which automatically posts to your social media platforms when you publish a new post—started attaching an image to your tweets to help them catch people’s attention.

At the time, a tweet with a picture would perform better than a tweet with just a link.

This is all fine and good, but a lot has changed since Jetpack started doing that. Twitter cards, if nothing else, not only were developed but were opened up to all (remember when you used to have to opt-in?). When you attach media, that’s the “special” part of your tweet. The Twitter Card, rendered from the meta tags on your post, is not displayed.

Today, effective for all versions of Jetpack and all WordPress.com sites, Publicize will no longer attach a picture to your tweet, instead allowing Twitter to display the Twitter card it renders.

If you want to return to the old way and are on Jetpack 8.5 (released today) or WordPress.com Business, you can add a small code snippet to change it.

add_filter( 'jetpack_publicize_options', function( $option ) { 
    $option['attach_media'] = true;
    return $option;
} );

This filter will, in the end, notify WordPress.com’s server of your preference and use it for future Publicize posts.

Questions about Jetpack’s Publicize feature? There is a team of Happiness Engineers ready to help!

Categories
Microblog Personal WordPress

I’m a Code Wrangler

This is old news at this point, but I realized I never mentioned it here. A few months back, I shifted from a Happiness Lead to a developer.

I’m excited about the move and especially that I’m able to continue to work on Jetpack. I’ve always worked with the code powering Jetpack, but usually minor things that I discovered through working directly with our customers.

My goal isn’t to create some sweeping new feature, but to make steady, solid improvements to Jetpack. Small fixes that improve what real people are seeing with the project are beautiful things.

Of course, my tinkering is on hold a bit while on paternity leave and being on the sidelines while WordPress 5.0 ships isn’t easy! There is so much to learn, explore, and create in the space with the Block Editor, but I’ll be slinging code again soon!