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mass draft of 2004: introductory rites

The differences in the translation starts right at the beginning with the Introductory Rites.
Latin: 2. Deinde sacerdos, manus extendens, populum salutat, dicens:
ICEL 2004: 2. Then, extending his hands, the priest greets the people, singing or saying:
ICEL 1973: Then the priest, facing the people, extends his hands and greets all present with one of the following greetings:
USCCB 1966: [no similar passage]
Commentary: Not much to say here except notice that the instruction to face the people have been removed. That indicates that the ‘standard’ method of saying Mass is facing the people. The 1973 translation gave instructions to the priest on when to face the people, if he was celebrating Mass facing the altar. A shift away from the days of old?
Latin: Gratia Domini nostri Iesu Christi, et caritas Dei, et communicatio Sancti Spiritus sit cum omnibus vobis.
ICEL 2004: The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, and the love of God and the communion of the Holy Spirit be with you all.
ICEL 1973: The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ and the love of God and the fellowship of the Holy Spirit be with you all.
USCCB 1966: [no similar passage]
Commentary: The difference between “fellowship” and “communion” is a sharp one. Fellowship implies friendship, companionship or simply being together. We gather together in community in fellowship. We do not seek simply fellowship with our God. Communion says sharing, something more intimate than fellowship. Communion better communicates the intimate nature of God and man. The Holy Spirit was conceived in the womb of a mortal woman to form God incarnate. That type of union is much stronger than fellowship.
Latin: Gratia vobis et pax a Deo Patre nostro et Domino Iesu Christo.
ICEL 2004: Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ.
ICEL 1973: The grace and peace of God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ be with you.
USCCB 1966: [no similar passage]
Commentary: In this case, I’m simply not sure of the difference. Checking both typica Latin versions, they are the same in the mother language. After re-reading it many times, perhaps the difference falls in what the nature of grace and peace. Can grace “be with you” or do you receive grace? The peace of Christ remains with us but is it the same with grace? I don’t know but I would venture with what I know there is some difference. We speak of grace as something we receive.The way we speak of ‘peace’ is different. Peace from God and peace of God? Any ideas of the difference?
Latin: Et cum spiritu tuo
ICEL 2004: And with your spirit.
ICEL 1973: And also with you.
USCCB 1966: And with your spirit.*
*- The 1966 edition does not have “Et cum spiritu tuo/And with your spirit” in this place; however, as it is a common piece of dialogue, it does appear later.
Commentary: Times like this is when it is obvious to me that I know nothing regarding liturgy and liturgical language. The difference between wishing a person something and wishing their spirit something is meaningful. How? I don’t know.


Mass Draft of 2004:
The Introductory Rites
1. When the people are gathered, the priest with the ministers approaches the altar during the entrance chant.
When he has arrived at the altar, after making a profound bow with the ministers, the priest venerates the altar with a kiss and, if circumstances so suggest, incenses the cross and the altar. After this, with the ministers, he goes to the chair.
After the entrance chant is finishes, the priest and the faithful, standing, sign themselves with the sign of the cross, while the priest, turned towards the people, sings or says:
In the name of the Father and the Son and the Holy Spirit.
The people respond:
Amen.
2. Then, extending his hands, the priest greets the people, singing or saying:
The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ,
and the love of God,
and the communion of the Holy Spirit
be with you all.

or:
Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ.
or:
The Lord be with you.
The people respond:
And with your spirit.
In place of The Lord be with you, for this first greeting a Bishop sings or says:
Peace be with you.
3. The priest, or a deacon or other minister, may briefly introduce the faithful to the Mass of the day.
Latin Typical Edition:
Ritus initiales
1. Populo congregeto, sacerdos cum ministris ad altare accedit, dum cantus ad introitum peragitur.
Cum ad altare pervenerit, facta cum ministris profunda inclinatione, osculo altare veneratur et, pro opportunitate, crucern et altare incensat. Postea cum ministris sedem petit.
Cantu ad introitum absoluto, sacerdos et fideles, stantes, signant se signo crucis, dum sacerdos, ad populum conversus, dicit:
In nomine Patris, et Filii, et Spiritus Sancti.
Populus respondet:
Amen.
2. Deinde sacerdos, manus extendens, populum salutat, dicens:
Gratia Domini nostri Iesu Christi, et caritas Dei, et communicatio Sancti Spiritus sit cum omnibus vobis.
Vel:
Gratia vobis et pax a Deo Patre nostro et Domino Iesu Christo.
Vel:
Dominus vobiscum.
Populus respondet:
Et cum spiritu tuo
Episcopus, Ioco Dominus vobiscum, in hac prima salutatione dicit:
Pax vobis.
3. Sacerdos, vel diaconus vel alius minister, potest brevissimis verbis introducere fideles in Missam diei.
1973 translation:
Introductory Rites
After the people have assembled, the priest and the ministers go to the altar while the entrance song is being sung.
When the priest comes to the altar, he makes the customary reverence with the ministers, kisses the altar and (if incense is used) incenses it. Then, with the ministers, he goes to the chair.
After the entrance song, the priest and the faithful remain standing and make the sign of the cross, as the priest says:
In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.
The people respond:
Amen.
Then the priest, facing the people, extends his hands and greets all present with one of the following greetings:
A. The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ and the love of God and the fellowship of the Holy Spirit be with you all.
The people respond:
And also with you.
Or the priest says:
B. The grace and peace of God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ be with you.
The people answer:
Blessed be God, the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ.
Or: And also with you.
Or the priest says:
C. The Lord be with you.
The people answer:
And also with you.
(Instead of the greeting The Lord be with you, a bishop says, Peace with you.
The priest, deacon, or other suitable minister may very briefly introduce the Mass of the day.
St. Joseph Daily Missal of 1966 (English):
Entrance Rite
While the priest recites the Prayers at the foot of the Altar with the ministers or server, the people usually recite or sing the Intoit Antiphon and/or an Entrance Hymn. (They may also recite the server’s parts).
In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit. Amen.
Priest:I will go to the altar of God.
Server:To God Who gives joy to my youth.
Priest:Our help is in the Name of the Lord.
Server:Who made heaven and earth.
St. Joseph Daily Missal of 1966 (Latin):
In nomine Patris, et Filii, et Spiritus Sancti. Amen.
Priest: Introibo ad altare Dei.
Server: Ad Deum qui laetificat iuventutem meam.
Priest: Adiutorium nostrum in nomine Domini.
Server: Qui fecit caelum et terram.

By Brandon Kraft

My life is an open-source book.

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